devPunks

After dev bootcamp there's devPunks.

RubyConf 2016 - Why Is Open Source So Closed? by Ra'Shaun Stovall

Why is Open Source So Closed? With the rapidly increasing amount of students coming out of bootcamp schools we have now created a gap within our communities of the "haves", and the "Looking for job"s. Being the organizer of New York City's 4,500+ member Ruby community with NYC.rb I have discovered ways we can ensure the generations of rubyists after us have a path paved before them. "Cyclical Mentorship" is the answer. Best part is we will know individually how we can immediately begin the feedback loop of not computers, but people!

#theCulture

devPunks include a diverse array of ideologies, fashions and forms of expression, including visual art, literature, and film. Devpunk are largely characterized by anti-establishment views and the promotion of individual freedom. The devPunk is centered on a loud, aggressive genre of developers. It is usually played by small teams consisting of a junior, one or two seniors, and a hiring manager.

Politics

devPunk politics cover the entire political spectrum. devPunk-related ideologies are mostly concerned with individual freedom and anti-establishment views. Common devPunk viewpoints include anti-authoritarianism, a DIY ethic, non-conformity, direct action and not selling out.

Community

devPunks can come from any and all walks of life and economic classes. Compared to some alternative cultures, devPunk is much closer to being gender equalist in terms of its ideology.

One part of devPunk is creating explicitly outward identities of mentality. Everything that was normally supposed to be hidden was brought to the front, both literally and figuratively.

Vodcast

devPunks often follow a DIY policy of filming and recording content first, without permission, and also posting it without permission, but will generally take down material if asked.

devPunk communities use collaborative podcasts & vocasts to support multiple contributors podcasting through generally simplified processes, and without having to host their own individual feeds. A community podcast can also allow members of the community (related to the podcast topic) to contribute to the podcast in many different ways. This method was first used for a series of podcasts hosted by the Regional Educational Technology Center at Fordham University in 2005.

💻 devPunks: “This is the Show Title”
@devPunks First Guest
First Guest
@JessiTron
30:00 minute viewing time

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Sponsors
Pivotal Labs

Pivotal Labs has been at the forefront of agile development for more than two decades building highly reliable, scalable software for innovative industry leaders and emerging companies across a number of industries. We’ve partnered with technical teams ranging in experience from the newly minted to the seasoned; together we’ve launched hundreds of web and mobile products and built complex enterprise infrastructures that run some of the world’s most effective business platforms.

Pivotal Labs has worked with some of the most innovative companies in today's market including Twitter, Salesforce.com, Groupon, EMI, Urban Dictionary, Best Buy, TaskRabbit, and the Annie E. Casey Foundation. Pivotal Labs is also the company behind Pivotal Tracker, the award winning project management tool used by developers around the world.

Founded in 1989, Pivotal Labs has offices in San Francisco, Los Angeles, Boulder, Denver, Boston, New York and London.

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